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DINGOES AREN'T DOGS

When the term ‘wild dogs’ is used to describe the Dingo, it erases the ecological and cultural significance of the native Dingo.

Dingoes hold a unique place in many First Nations Cultures and any population management practices need to be developed in close consultation with First Nations People.

More than 80% of ‘wild dogs’ in NSW are estimated to be more than 75% genetically Dingo. Dingoes are presently being killed by means of aerial and ground baiting, shooting and trapping. Government bodies such as the NSW Department of Primary Industries, recognises ‘wild dogs’ as a declared pest animal, yet they aren’t dogs, they’re Dingoes.

Dingoes are vital to the health of our ecosystems, suppressing invasive species populations such as rabbits, foxes and cats and native herbivore species such as kangaroos. This improves the health of vegetation and bushland and all of the animals that depend on it.

We’re calling for Dingoes to be protected along with other natives species by:

Ending indiscriminate killing through ground and aerial baiting
While concern by agriculturalists has been expressed as the impact of Dingoes on livestock, non lethal means of management can be deployed, or as is increasingly being recognised, Dingoes can play an important role in the agricultural landscape. Dingoes are an apex predator, managing populations of animals like kangaroos, feral animals like goats, pigs and rabbits and thus improving the pasture quality that is in turn used for livestock. Their role in the ecosystem is vital for the survival of many species.

Recognising the unique cultural significance of the Dingo to First Nations People
Any plan of population management of Dingoes needs to be developed in close consultation with First Nations People. Dingoes are recorded in artworks, rock shelters and songlines and are part of First Nations Cultural Heritage. This cannot be ignored.

Including Dingoes in the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016
Dingoes are currently excluded from the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 so are not offered the protections provided to other native species. Dingoes are listed as wild dogs in the Local Land Services Act 2013 Dingoes have become part of the ecology and landscape over thousands of years, playing an important role in maintaining the health of our ecosystems.

Removing use of the term wild dog and replacing it with Dingo
The term wild dog is used to justify the classification of Dingoes as pests. Calling Dingoes by this name ignores the fact that Dingoes are said to have populated Australian lands for more than 3500 years. We need to delist Dingoes as wild dogs in the Local Land Services Act 2013.

DINGOES AREN'T DOGS

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Dingoes hold a unique place in many First Nations Cultures and are vital to the health of our ecosystems.

Add your voice to help protect our precious native dingoes.

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